Andro Dadiani Reviews:
Sometimes Water Bursts out from dried up Fountains

 

‘Sometimes Water bursts out of dried up Fountains’ is the name of the exhibition, at The Why Not Gallery, a solo show by Mariam Aqubardia. A series of paintings presented remind of family archives, sepia excerpts from videos. Everything is in constant movement here- buildings with creaking doors, humanless spaces with overgrown palms and black clouds, so heavy about to burst; the fountains gush in emptiness and breeze moves their streams.

The exhibition is exceptionally musicall, but with a peculiar definition of music, close to Mozart, Cage and Kancheli- for all of them silence (a pause) is a crucial nuance; Mariam Aqubardia’s painting is similar, it is a painting of silence - uninhabited spaces where nature takes over (palms about to break into abandoned hotel windows and rest in hotel rooms). Everything around is infiltrated with overflowing saddness, low atmospheric tempo and intense inner tension; festive sensations with sparkles and cakes are somewhere else – on the TV, people here are out of breath with fear, their vocal movements (laughter, a scream before falling down) are so quiet, that remind of a distant dream or a faded photo, that in present play in silence.

For a naked eye, presented paintings feel like the XXV shots, Aqubardia’s artistic instrument is not a culminating ‘screenshot’ – but instead highlights peripheral details, that like naked virgins are stripped bare in front of the viewer and unabashedly, with pristine clarity make the viewer feel these emotions. The pictorial concept of the series - the faded palette gives the impression that this energy, so natural to our feeling is already experienced by our ancestors, this unity is only natural for us and nothing in it is imprinted with a disturbing pretentiousness of understanding.